07-20-2017  7:44 pm      •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways

This summer the eight-mile bike route takes place on July 23, from 11 a.m - 4 p.m. ...

APANO: Cultural Series Launches with Solidarity Film Screening

"American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs" screens on July 25 at North Portland Library ...

National Hunger Hotline Seeks to Reach More Children in Need

Callers can locate summer meals sites for kids, food pantries, and other meals programs near them ...

ICS Announces New Executive Director

Lisa LeSage has been named the new Executive Director of Immigration Counseling Service ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

Nooses on National Mall Echo Domestic Terrorism

Lauren Victoria Burke reports on a series of domestic terrorist attacks across the U.S ...

White House Proposes $9.2 Billion Cut in Education Funding

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes about the rising costs of higher education ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

(CNN) -- Inadequate security measures and an unprepared military are two factors that allowed a group of Islamists to attack and take hostages at a gas field in Algeria in January, a report says.

The report by Statoil, whose employees were among those taken hostage, says the companies that ran the gas field never anticipated a scenario where a large force of attackers hit the facility.

The companies were too dependent on the Algerian military, which was "not able to detect or prevent the attackers from reaching the site," the report says.

At least 37 hostages were killed in the four-day ordeal.

The plant is run by In Amenas Gas, a joint venture between oil giant BP, Statoil, and Sonatrach.

Among the victims were five Statoil employees, which led the company to conduct an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the attack.

"The terror attack against In Amenas was an unprecedented attack," lead investigator Torgeir Hagen said in a statement. "It clearly demonstrates that also companies like Statoil today face serious security threats."

The investigation team concluded that a different response to the attack would not have changed the outcome.

But the lesson is that the site was not designed with security measures that would stop or slow an attack on that scale, the report says.

The militant siege caught the world's attention as it ensnared citizens from several nations and dragged on for days.

Algerian authorities said they believe the attack was revenge for allowing France to use Algerian airspace for an offensive against Islamist militants in neighboring Mali.

A group led by the jihadist commander known as "Mr. Marlboro," Moktar Belmoktar, was responsible for the deadly attack.

The plant in southern Algeria employed about 790 people, including 134 foreign workers.

 

Oregon Lottery PM Home (2)
Calendar
Carpentry Professionals

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives