11-21-2017  9:26 am      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

SEI, Sunshine Division Offer Thanksgiving Meals to Families in Need

Turkeys are being provided to fill 200 Thanksgiving food boxes for SEI families ...

NAACP Portland Monthly Meeting Nov. 18

Monthly general membership meeting takes place on Saturday, 12 - 2 p.m. ...

Multnomah County Animal Services Waives Adoption Fees Nov. 17

Special runs from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday ...

Fitzpatrick Presents 'Pathway 1000' Plan Before City Council

Plan would restore involuntary displacement by building 80 homes per year ...

Sisters Network to Hold Monthly Meeting Nov. 11

Meeting to take place Saturday morning at June Key Delta Center ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Local Author Visits North Portland Library

Renee Watson teaches students and educators about the power of writing ...

Is the FBI’s New Focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the New COINTELPRO?

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.) talks about the FBI’s misguided report on “Black Identity Extremism” and negative Facebook ads. ...

ACA Enrollment Surging, Even Though It Ends Dec. 15

NNPA contributing writer Cash Michaels writes about enrollment efforts ...

Blacks Often Pay Higher Fees for Car Purchases than Whites

Charlene Crowell explains why Black consumers often pay higher fees than White consumers, because of “add-on” products. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Mariano Castillo CNN

(CNN) -- Inadequate security measures and an unprepared military are two factors that allowed a group of Islamists to attack and take hostages at a gas field in Algeria in January, a report says.

The report by Statoil, whose employees were among those taken hostage, says the companies that ran the gas field never anticipated a scenario where a large force of attackers hit the facility.

The companies were too dependent on the Algerian military, which was "not able to detect or prevent the attackers from reaching the site," the report says.

At least 37 hostages were killed in the four-day ordeal.

The plant is run by In Amenas Gas, a joint venture between oil giant BP, Statoil, and Sonatrach.

Among the victims were five Statoil employees, which led the company to conduct an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the attack.

"The terror attack against In Amenas was an unprecedented attack," lead investigator Torgeir Hagen said in a statement. "It clearly demonstrates that also companies like Statoil today face serious security threats."

The investigation team concluded that a different response to the attack would not have changed the outcome.

But the lesson is that the site was not designed with security measures that would stop or slow an attack on that scale, the report says.

The militant siege caught the world's attention as it ensnared citizens from several nations and dragged on for days.

Algerian authorities said they believe the attack was revenge for allowing France to use Algerian airspace for an offensive against Islamist militants in neighboring Mali.

A group led by the jihadist commander known as "Mr. Marlboro," Moktar Belmoktar, was responsible for the deadly attack.

The plant in southern Algeria employed about 790 people, including 134 foreign workers.

 

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