07-21-2017  7:54 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Augustana Lutheran Church Hosts Summer in the City Aug. 6

Free event includes BBQ, book sale, children’s games, music ...

Health Officials Warn of Spike in Heroin Overdoses

Emergency providers urge use of nalaxone, which is available without a prescription ...

Students Reach New Heights

Two rising sophomores attend aviation camp in Vancouver, Wash. ...

Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways

This summer the eight-mile bike route takes place on July 23, from 11 a.m - 4 p.m. ...

APANO: Cultural Series Launches with Solidarity Film Screening

"American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs" screens on July 25 at North Portland Library ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

Nooses on National Mall Echo Domestic Terrorism

Lauren Victoria Burke reports on a series of domestic terrorist attacks across the U.S ...

White House Proposes $9.2 Billion Cut in Education Funding

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes about the rising costs of higher education ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

(CNN) -- Congress on Tuesday bestowed its highest civilian honor on the four African-American girls killed in a 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, all 14, and Denise McNair, 11, were killed during Sunday services on September 15, 1963, at 16th Street Baptist Church.

Their senseless deaths "awakened the slumbering consciousness of America and galvanized the civil rights movement," Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell said at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol.

"Fifty years later, we finally honor their life and legacy. Justice delayed but not denied," Sewell said.

At the ceremony, House Speaker John Boehner recalled details of the girls' lives.

Addie Mae went door-to-door after school selling aprons and potholders her mother made. Denise put on skits in the garage to raise money for muscular dystrophy research.

Carole made sure her chores were done so she could go to dance class on Saturdays, while Cynthia excelled in math and band.

"Birmingham had to go through hell but found its way back and pushed itself forward and pushed the whole country forward as well," Boehner said. "This is one of the true American stories."

Three former Ku Klux Klan members were convicted in the church bombing, which left at least 14 other people injured.

President Barack Obama signed legislation granting the posthumous honor in May.

CNN's Michael Martinez contributed to this report.

 

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