02-26-2017  11:01 pm      •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Barbara Reynold’s Coretta Scott King Memoir Is a Must-Read

Reynold’s memoir shows Coretta Scott King as a leader in her own right, as a dedicated pacifist, as a persistent adherent to...

Share Your Story: Why I'm Speaking Up on Obamacare

The Center for American Progress is collecting testimonials from Americans who have benefited from Obamacare. Take a minute to share...

Neonatal Mortality: The Quiet Crisis of the African-American Community

It will take all of us, working together, to ensure African-American babies born in America have every opportunity to thrive ...

Lawmakers, Lobbyists Attack Consumer Protection Agency

While CFPB opponents and supporters continue to air their differences, Charlene Crowell says that Director Cordray and his staff are...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

(CNN) -- Congress on Tuesday bestowed its highest civilian honor on the four African-American girls killed in a 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, all 14, and Denise McNair, 11, were killed during Sunday services on September 15, 1963, at 16th Street Baptist Church.

Their senseless deaths "awakened the slumbering consciousness of America and galvanized the civil rights movement," Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell said at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol.

"Fifty years later, we finally honor their life and legacy. Justice delayed but not denied," Sewell said.

At the ceremony, House Speaker John Boehner recalled details of the girls' lives.

Addie Mae went door-to-door after school selling aprons and potholders her mother made. Denise put on skits in the garage to raise money for muscular dystrophy research.

Carole made sure her chores were done so she could go to dance class on Saturdays, while Cynthia excelled in math and band.

"Birmingham had to go through hell but found its way back and pushed itself forward and pushed the whole country forward as well," Boehner said. "This is one of the true American stories."

Three former Ku Klux Klan members were convicted in the church bombing, which left at least 14 other people injured.

President Barack Obama signed legislation granting the posthumous honor in May.

CNN's Michael Martinez contributed to this report.

 

Oregon Lottery
Calendar

PHOTO GALLERY

Reed College Jobs
Lauren Weedman

The Armory Wild & Reckless
The Skanner Photo Archives