09-19-2017  10:42 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Tim Burgess Inaugurated as 55th Mayor of Seattle

Burgess, a former radio journalist, served as Seattle City Councilmember from 2008 to 2017 ...

Mobile Mammography Van Comes to Health Fair, Oct. 7

Onsite mammograms, music, food, health information, and fun ...

Humboldt Sewer Repair Project Update: September 15, 2017

Environmental Services continues a project to repair more than 3 miles of public sewer pipes ...

NAACP Portland Branch Invites Community to Monthly General Membership Meeting

Meeting takes place from noon to 2 p.m. Sept. 23 ...

Portland to Launch Online Platform to Ease Rental Applications

One App Oregon will reduce barriers to accessing affordable housing for the city's renters ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Jeff Trades an Unknown Known for a Known Known

Jeff Tryens reflects on life in Central Oregon ...

We Must Have A New Poor People's Campaign and Moral Revival

Bishop William J. Barber II pens an exclusive op-ed about the need for a New Poor People's Campaign and Moral Revival. ...

Rebuilding the Gulf Coast, Preparing for the Next Harvey

Bill Fletcher talks about impact of Hurricane Harvey on poor workers on the the Gulf Coast. ...

It’s Time for Congress to Pass a Hurricane Harvey Emergency Funding Package

Congressional Black Caucus Members talk about recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Dana Ford CNN

(CNN) -- Congress on Tuesday bestowed its highest civilian honor on the four African-American girls killed in a 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, all 14, and Denise McNair, 11, were killed during Sunday services on September 15, 1963, at 16th Street Baptist Church.

Their senseless deaths "awakened the slumbering consciousness of America and galvanized the civil rights movement," Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell said at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol.

"Fifty years later, we finally honor their life and legacy. Justice delayed but not denied," Sewell said.

At the ceremony, House Speaker John Boehner recalled details of the girls' lives.

Addie Mae went door-to-door after school selling aprons and potholders her mother made. Denise put on skits in the garage to raise money for muscular dystrophy research.

Carole made sure her chores were done so she could go to dance class on Saturdays, while Cynthia excelled in math and band.

"Birmingham had to go through hell but found its way back and pushed itself forward and pushed the whole country forward as well," Boehner said. "This is one of the true American stories."

Three former Ku Klux Klan members were convicted in the church bombing, which left at least 14 other people injured.

President Barack Obama signed legislation granting the posthumous honor in May.

CNN's Michael Martinez contributed to this report.

 

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