02-24-2018  4:11 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Breaking Bread Breaking Barriers, Feb. 26

Monthly dinner aims to build relationships between communities of color and police ...

Local Group Researches African American Ancestry

This Genealogical Forum of Oregon special interest group holds monthly meetings ...

Last Day to Apply for Affordable Housing is Feb. 22

Longtime and displaced residents of N/NE Portland receive preference for new housing, apply before midnight Thursday ...

NAACP Announces Key Partnerships

Voter mobilization for 2018 midterm elections takes precedence among issues uniting groups ...

Winter Donations Needed, Warming Centers Open Through Thursday

Locals encouraged to check on neighbors, winter gear needed ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Painting President Obama's Portrait Was Life-Changing

Artist Kehinde Wiley represented the president's life using color, composition and flowers ...

Raising Emotionally Competent Children

Lynnette Monroe on how her grandparents taught her to love herself ...

Black Dollars Matter: The Sales Impact of Black Consumers

Black consumers are spending jumi.2 trillion annually and are demanding that brands speak to them in ways that resonate...

Guest Opinion: Skipper Osborne’s Testimony on HB 4005

In testimony to legislature, Osborne says bill could decrease access to important therapies ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Dana Ford CNN

(CNN) -- Congress on Tuesday bestowed its highest civilian honor on the four African-American girls killed in a 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, all 14, and Denise McNair, 11, were killed during Sunday services on September 15, 1963, at 16th Street Baptist Church.

Their senseless deaths "awakened the slumbering consciousness of America and galvanized the civil rights movement," Alabama Rep. Terri Sewell said at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol.

"Fifty years later, we finally honor their life and legacy. Justice delayed but not denied," Sewell said.

At the ceremony, House Speaker John Boehner recalled details of the girls' lives.

Addie Mae went door-to-door after school selling aprons and potholders her mother made. Denise put on skits in the garage to raise money for muscular dystrophy research.

Carole made sure her chores were done so she could go to dance class on Saturdays, while Cynthia excelled in math and band.

"Birmingham had to go through hell but found its way back and pushed itself forward and pushed the whole country forward as well," Boehner said. "This is one of the true American stories."

Three former Ku Klux Klan members were convicted in the church bombing, which left at least 14 other people injured.

President Barack Obama signed legislation granting the posthumous honor in May.

CNN's Michael Martinez contributed to this report.

 

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