10-16-2017  11:03 pm      •     
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U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

On Dick Gregory's Birthday

Dr. Barbara Reynolds recalls Gregory's encouragement to write about 'the seen and the unseen' ...

Parents Deserve “Real” School Choice

Dr. Elizabeth Primas challenges Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on school choice. ...

The Fight to Protect Voting Rights Continues #StayWoke

Derrick Johnson, the interim president and CEO of the NAACP, talks about the fight to protect voting rights ...

Lessons From Vanport: Don’t Let History Wash Away

Portland resident Muyoka Mwarabu writes about discovering Portland's Black history ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Democracy Now

Fifty years ago this week, Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, A Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin and other civil rights leaders spoke at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. But where were the female civil rights activists? At the historic march, only one woman spoke for just more than a minute — Daisy Bates of the NAACP. Today we are joined by civil rights pioneer Gloria Richardson, the co-founder of the Cambridge Nonviolent Action Committee in Maryland, which fought to desegregate public institutions like schools and hospitals. While Richardson was on the program for the March on Washington, when she stood to speak she only had a chance to say hello before the microphone was seized. Richardson is the subject of a pending biography by Joseph R. Fitzgerald, "The Struggle is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation." Richardson, 91, joins us to discuss the 1963 March on Washington and the censorship of women speakers; the Cambridge Movement to desegregate Maryland; her friendship with Malcolm X; and her assessment of President Obama and the civil rights struggle today.



For a full copy of the transcript, go here.

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