05-28-2017  8:54 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Art Museum Hosts Upstanders Festival May 27

Event includes spoken word, workshops and poster making in support of social justice ...

Happy Memorial Day

The Skanner wishes readers a safe and happy Memorial Day ...

North Portland Library Announces June Computer Classes

Upcoming courses include Introduction to Spreadsheets, What is the Cloud? and Learn Programming with Games ...

Merkley to Hold Town Hall in Clackamas County

Sen. Jeff Merkley to hold town hall in Clackamas County, May 30 ...

NAACP Monthly Meeting Notice, May 27, Portland

NAACP Portland invites the community to its monthly general membership meeting ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Ensuring the Promise of the Every Student Succeeds Act

The preservation of Thurgood Marshall's legacy is dependent upon our dedication to our children ...

CFPB Sues Ocwen Financial over Unfair Mortgage Practices

What many homeowners soon discover is that faithfully paying a monthly mortgage is in some cases, just not enough ...

B-CU Grads Protest Betsy “DeVoid” in Epic Fashion

Julianne Malveaux says that Betsy “DeVoid,” is no Mary McLeod Bethune ...

NAACP on Supreme Court's Decline to Review NC Voter ID Law

NAACP President and CEO Cornell William Brooks made the following remarks ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

FORT HOOD, Texas (CNN) -- Family members of victims of the Fort Hood massacre were prepared to testify Monday about their grief, as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan's court-martial moved quickly toward a dramatic conclusion.

A military jury by Tuesday could begin considering whether Hasan will get capital punishment for the November 2009 shootings on this sprawling Army base.

The Army Medical Corps officer was convicted Friday on all 13 counts of murder and 32 counts of attempted murder in connection with the shooting rampage at a Fort Hood deployment processing center. The incident occurred about a month before Hasan was to deploy to Afghanistan.

The sentencing phase began Monday with Hasan again insisting he represent himself as his own attorney. The Army judge, Col. Tara Osborn, called it "dangerous, disadvantageous."

"You are staking your life on the decisions you make," she told Hasan. "It is unwise for you to represent yourself, but that is your choice."

The panel of 13 senior officers is expected to hear two or three days of testimony in open court during the sentencing phase.

Military officials say prosecutors could present more than 16 witnesses, including a liaison or family member for each victim killed in the attack. They will describe the impact the shootings had on their lives, part of the "aggravating" evidence the prosecution will use to try to demonstrate why Hasan deserves lethal injection.

During the nearly three-week trial phase, military prosecutors called 89 witnesses and submitted more than 700 pieces of evidence.

Unclear is whether Hasan himself will now present testimony or speak on his own behalf. He has so far refused to put on a defense in court.

The American-born psychiatrist of Palestinian descent has the opportunity to offer "mitigating" evidence that could persuade the panel to spare his life.

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