05 24 2016
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  • The judge concluded Officer Edward Nero played little role in the arrest and wasn't responsible for the failure by police to buckle Gray in  
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  • Bill Cosby faces a preliminary hearing Tuesday to determine if his criminal sex-assault case in suburban Philadelphia goes to trial.Prosecutors had declined to charge the comedian-actor over the 2005 complaint, but arrested him in December after his explosive deposition in the woman's lawsuit became public. In the testimony given in that deposition, Cosby is grilled about giving drugs and alcohol to women before sex; making secret payments to ex-lovers; and hosting Andrea Constand at his home. They knew each other through Temple University, where he was a trustee and she managed the women's basketball team. Bill Cosby's wife refused to answer dozens of questions during a combative deposition in a defamation lawsuit filed by seven women who say the comedian branded them liars after they accused him of sexually assaulting them, according to a transcript released Friday. Camille Cosby was subjected to intense questioning by the women's lawyer, who repeatedly pressed her to say whether she believes her husband "acted with a lack of integrity" during their 52-year marriage. The lawyer also asked if her husband used his position and power "to manipulate young women." Camille Cosby didn't answer those questions and many others after her lawyer cited marital privilege, the legal protection given to communications between spouses. She repeatedly said she had "no opinion" when pressed on whether she viewed her husband's behavior as dishonest and a violation of their marriage vows. About 50 women have publicly accused Bill Cosby of forcing unwanted sexual contact on them decades ago. Cosby has denied the allegations. He faces a criminal case in Pennsylvania, where prosecutors have charged him with sexually violating a former Temple University employee, Andrea Constand. He has pleaded not guilty. Camille Cosby answered questions in the deposition Feb. 22 and again April 19 after her lawyers argued unsuccessfully to stop it. A judge ruled she would have to give a deposition but said she could refuse to answer questions about private communications between her and her husband. Camille Cosby's lawyer, Monique Pressley, repeatedly cited that privilege and advised her not to answer many questions asked by the women's lawyer, Joseph Cammarata. The exchanges between Cammarata and Cosby became testy at times, and she admonished him: "Don't lecture me. Just keep going with the questions." Using a transcript of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a civil lawsuit filed by Constand in 2005 and a transcript of an interview she gave to Oprah Winfrey in 2000, Cammarata asked Camille Cosby about extramarital affairs her husband had. "Were you aware of your husband setting up trusts for the benefit of women that he had a sexual relationship with?" Cammarata asked. She didn't answer after her lawyer cited marital privilege. Cammarata asked her about Shawn Thompson, a woman who said Bill Cosby fathered her daughter, Autumn Jackson, in the 1970s. Jackson was convicted in 1997 of attempting to extort money from Bill Cosby to prevent her from telling a tabloid she's his daughter. He acknowledged he had an affair with her mother and had given her money. "Was it a big deal when this came up in the 1970s that your husband had — big deal to you that your husband had an extramarital affair and potentially had a daughter from that extramarital affair?" Cammarata asked. "It was a big deal then, yes," Camille Cosby replied. She said she had "no opinion" on whether her husband's admission he obtained quaaludes to give to women with whom he wanted to have sex violated their marriage vows. Her lawyer objected and instructed her not to answer when Cammarata asked her if she ever suspected she had been given any type of drug to alter her state of consciousness when she had sex with her husband. A spokesman for the Cosbys declined to comment on her deposition. The Cosbys have a home in Shelburne Falls, an hour's drive from Springfield, where the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, was filed. An attorney handling a separate lawsuit against Bill Cosby revealed Friday that Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner provided sworn testimony Wednesday. In the sexual battery lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judy Huth says Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him at the Playboy Mansion around 1974, when she was 15. Bill Cosby's former lawyers have accused Huth of attempting to extort him before filing the case and have tried unsuccessfully to have it dismissed. Huth's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Hefner's testimony will remain under seal for now. Hefner also was named as a defendant in a case filed Monday by former model Chloe Goins, who accuses Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion in 2008.   The Associated Press generally doesn't identify people who say they're victims of sexual abuse, but the women accusing Cosby have come forward to tell their stories.___AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report from Los Angeles.
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  • Some hope killing will bring peace in Afghanistan     
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An Egyptian court has ordered the release of deposed leader Hosni Mubarak in a corruption case, state-run media outlet Al-Ahram reported Wednesday.

Egypt's General Prosecutor has said he will not appeal to keep Mubarak in custody, state media reported, clearing the way for him to be released. However, it is not clear how soon this could come.

State-run TV channel Al-Masriya cited a lawyer for Mubarak as saying he may be released as soon as Thursday.

Mubarak still faces a retrial for the most serious charge against him, that of inciting violence against protesters during the 2011 uprising that brought about his removal from office. He could face the death penalty if found guilty on that count.

There are conflicting reports about the status of the corruption case against him.

The court ordered Mubarak's release because he has been held past the maximum time he can be detained before being convicted.

The only condition for his release is that he must remain in the country.

The 85-year-old has been held in detention since he was convicted last year on charges that he was complicit in the protesters' killings and sentenced to life in prison. He appealed and a retrial was granted early this year.

Mubarak's impending release comes at a time of turmoil in Egypt, where an interim military government has been in charge since Mubarak's successor, Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood, was ousted as president last month.

Over the past week, about 900 people -- security personnel as well as citizens -- have been killed. Deaths occurred when the military used force to clear two pro-Morsy sit-in sites in Cairo on Wednesday last week and violence raged after pro-Morsy supporters staged demonstrations Friday.

Mubarak ruled Egypt, the most populous Arab country, for three decades until demonstrators opposing his rule forced his ouster in 2011 as part of the Arab Spring revolutions across Africa and the Middle East.

The ousted autocratic leader's health has been a bone of contention during his lengthy trial last year and incarceration. He suffered a heart attack after relinquishing power and argued that he was physically unfit to stand trial.

He spent months of his detention in a military hospital but was ordered back to prison in April.

'Deeply divided'

Eric Trager, with the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, told CNN that Mubarak's release would likely prompt mixed reactions among Egyptians.

"For many Egyptians, Mubarak's release will be met with a shrug. Some will cheer it because obviously a regime cannot last for 30 years without some societal support," he said. "Others will certainly take to the streets in response to it."

But, he added, "the revolutionary youths who will certainly be outraged by this will probably also worry about finding themselves in the streets alongside the Muslim Brotherhood."

According to Trager, many Egyptians now believe -- thanks to a persistent state media campaign since Morsy was ousted -- that the Muslim Brotherhood was responsible for the deaths of protesters during the 2011 uprising, not the Mubarak regime.

As for the timing of the court's ruling, some Egyptians may see a conspiracy behind it in which the old regime seeks to reassert power following Morsy's ouster, Trager said.

"Others, who see this as a normal, understandable process in which a leader who they now associate with a better time in Egypt is now being released, will give a different response," he said.

"I expect that Egyptians will be divided on this as they have been deeply divided in every point of the last two-and-a-half years."

Tamarod, the anti-Morsy protest movement which called for the mass rallies that led to his ouster, said it was not surprised by the ruling on Mubarak's release.

In a statement on its official website, the group blamed Morsy's administration for failing to do enough to push Mubarak's trial forward.

The group called for a retrial of the former president, with new evidence before the court, and for Morsy to be put on trial as well.

The military, which has governed Egypt since forcing Morsy out of office, continues to hold him in detention and controls the judiciary.

CNN's Karl Penhaul reported from Cairo and Laura Smith-Spark wrote and reported in London. CNN's Slma Shelbayah, Tommy Evans and Saad Abedine, and journalist Sarah Sirgany contributed to this report.

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