11-18-2017  5:05 pm      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

SEI, Sunshine Division Offer Thanksgiving Meals to Families in Need

Turkeys are being provided to fill 200 Thanksgiving food boxes for SEI families ...

NAACP Portland Monthly Meeting Nov. 18

Monthly general membership meeting takes place on Saturday, 12 - 2 p.m. ...

Multnomah County Animal Services Waives Adoption Fees Nov. 17

Special runs from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday ...

Fitzpatrick Presents 'Pathway 1000' Plan Before City Council

Plan would restore involuntary displacement by building 80 homes per year ...

Sisters Network to Hold Monthly Meeting Nov. 11

Meeting to take place Saturday morning at June Key Delta Center ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Local Author Visits North Portland Library

Renee Watson teaches students and educators about the power of writing ...

Is the FBI’s New Focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the New COINTELPRO?

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.) talks about the FBI’s misguided report on “Black Identity Extremism” and negative Facebook ads. ...

ACA Enrollment Surging, Even Though It Ends Dec. 15

NNPA contributing writer Cash Michaels writes about enrollment efforts ...

Blacks Often Pay Higher Fees for Car Purchases than Whites

Charlene Crowell explains why Black consumers often pay higher fees than White consumers, because of “add-on” products. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

The Skanner News

Once again a heatwave is causing a MAX train slow-down, and The Skanner News asked Angela Murphy at TriMet: What does the weather have to do with the train tracks?

Murphy reports that today – and for any day when the temperatures are over 90 degrees – the MAX trains run 10 mph slower through areas where their usual speeds are above 35

"The slower speeds are necessary to prevent damage to the overhead wire and rails. Expect possible delays of up to 15 minutes," she advised riders this morning.

The impact that hot weather has on the steel rails and power lines is called "sun kink."

This is how TriMet describes it:

"When temperatures along the alignment reach 90 degrees, we reduce the speed of trains by 10 mph in areas above 35 miles per hour. When temperatures along the alignment reach 100 degrees, we reduce the speed of trains to no faster than 35 mph throughout the system.

"These heat related slow orders are put in place as a safety precaution because extreme heat can cause the rails (which are made of steel) and the overhead power wires (which are made of copper) to expand. When it's 100 degrees out, a 1-mile stretch of rail in the MAX system may expand up to a few inches. When it gets too hot it can actually bend or bow outward. Our operators and controllers call this a 'sun kink.'

"The overhead power wires may also expand in the heat. Because copper expands more than steel, and because we can't allow the overhead wires to sag, we have a system of pulleys with counterweights that tug on the wires to keep them tight. Sometimes, it gets so hot that the counterweights touch the ground and the wire starts to sag anyway.

"Our operators have to watch for both sagging power wires and 'sun kinked' rails when it's really hot out. To be safe, they slow down to make sure nothing goes wrong. As it gets hotter, they have to slow down more."

More information on MAX schedules here

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