04-25-2018  7:25 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Event: Going Beyond the Flint Water & Housing Crises

Recode invites speakers to discuss the Flint water crisis and its relationship to gentrification, displacement, and housing crises ...

Think & Drink with Rinku Sen and Mary Li

Event takes place Wednesday, May 16, at Alberta Rose Theater ...

April 24 is Voter Registration Deadline for May 15 Primary Election

Tuesday, April 24, is voter registration and party choice deadline for May 15 Primary Election ...

Portland Libraries Celebrate National Poetry Month

April poetry events and recommended reading from Multnomah County libraries ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

The Skanner News Endorsements for May 2018 Elections

Read The Skanner News' endorsements for Oregon, Multnomah County, Portland City Council and more ...

Will HUD Secretary Ben Carson Enforce the Fair Housing Act?

Julianne Malveaux questions HUD Secretary Ben Carson’s ability to enforce the Fair Housing Act ...

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Reggie Shuford on the daily indignities African-Americans face in Philadelphia and around the country ...

Black People Must Vote or Reap the Consequences

Jeffrey Boney on the importance of voting in the Black community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

By Ben Brumfield CNN

Bloodshed has unfortunately become commonplace in Iraq. And it reached a fevered pitch this year, the United Nations said in a monthly tally of violent deaths.

At least 4,137 civilians have been killed and 9,865 more injured in the country since January. Add to that hundreds of security personnel.

"We haven't seen such numbers in more than five years," said Gyorgy Busztin, a spokesman for the U.N. mission in Iraq.




Sectarian factions bomb and shoot one another on a nearly daily basis, and reports on the violence often fade into the back rows of news coverage, as one month of deadly statistics follows another.

But the dimension of the bloodletting is alarming, the U.N. reminded in its report Thursday.

It's hard to put the violence in Iraq in perspective, but in an indirect comparison, take a look at a fairly recent murder rate in a major city closer to home: Chicago.

In 2010, 436 people were murdered there, police statistics reveal. And that, to the Windy City's credit, is low after a steady decline in homicides over the last decade.

More people perished in the past two months alone in Baghdad from explosions, bullets and shrapnel. The U.N.'s total for July was 238. And in June, 258 civilians were killed in Baghdad, the U.N. said.

In those two months, an additional 1,411 people were injured in violence across the city. Across Iraq in those months, violence killed 1,818 people, the U.N. said.

The U.N. on Thursday called out once more to Iraq's political leaders to stop the mayhem.

It does not want to see Iraq return to a level of death similar to that wrought during active combat.

CNN's Hamdi Alkhshali and Mohammed Tawfeeq contributed to this report.

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