04 21 2015
  4:52 am  
     •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • When should we use military to enforce US goals? NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Rand Paul lashed out Saturday at military hawks in the Republican Party in a clash over foreign policy dividing the packed GOP presidential field. Paul, a first-term senator from Kentucky who favors a smaller U.S. footprint in the world, said that some of his Republican colleagues would do more harm in international affairs than would leading Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton. "The other Republicans will criticize the president and Hillary Clinton for their foreign policy, but they would just have done the same thing — just 10 times over," Paul said on the closing day of a New Hampshire GOP conference that brought about 20 presidential prospects to the first-in-the-nation primary state. "There's a group of folks in our party who would have troops in six countries right now, maybe more," Paul said. Foreign policy looms large in the presidential race as the U.S. struggles to resolve diplomatic and military conflicts across the globe. The GOP presidential class regularly rails against President Barack Obama's leadership on the world stage, yet some would-be contenders have yet to articulate their own positions, while others offered sharply different visions. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, whose brother, President George W. Bush, authorized the 2003 invasion of Iraq, declined to say whether he would have done anything different then. Yet Jeb Bush acknowledged a shift in his party against new military action abroad. "Our enemies need to fear us, a little bit, just enough for them to deter the actions that create insecurity," Bush said earlier in the conference. He said restoring alliances "that will create less likelihood of America's boots on the ground has to be the priority, the first priority of the next president." The GOP's hawks were well represented at the event, led by Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has limited foreign policy experience but articulated a muscular vision during his Saturday keynote address. Walker said the threats posed by radical Islamic terrorism won't be handled simply with "a couple bombings." "We're not going to wait till they bring the fight to us," Walker said. "We're going to bring the fight to them and fight on their soil." South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham addressed the question of putting U.S. troops directly in the battle against the Islamic State group militants by saying there is only one way to defeat the militants: "You go over there and you fight them so they don't come here." Texas Sen. Ted Cruz suggested an aggressive approach as well. "The way to defeat ISIS is a simple and clear military objective," he said. "We will destroy them." Businesswoman Carly Fiorina offered a similar outlook. "The world is a more dangerous and more tragic place when America is not leading. And America has not led for quite some time," she said. Under Obama, a U.S.-led coalition of Western and Arab countries is conducting regular airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. also has hundreds of military advisers in Iraq helping Iraqi security forces plan operations against the Islamic State, which occupies large chunks of northern and western Iraq. Paul didn't totally reject the use of military force, noting that he recently introduced a declaration of war against the Islamic State group. But in an interview with The Associated Press, he emphasized the importance of diplomacy. He singled out Russia and China, which have complicated relationships with the U.S., as countries that could contribute to U.S. foreign policy interests. "I think the Russians and the Chinese have great potential to help make the world a better place," he said. "I don't say that naively that they're going to, but they have the potential to." Paul suggested the Russians could help by getting Syrian President Bashar Assad to leave power. "Maybe he goes to Russia," Paul said. Despite tensions with the U.S., Russia and China negotiated alongside Washington in nuclear talks with Iran. Paul has said he is keeping an open mind about the nuclear negotiations. "The people who already are very skeptical, very doubtful, may not like the president for partisan reasons," he said, and "just may want war instead of negotiations."
    Read More
  • A number of the bills now before the Oregon State Legislature protect parties who have experienced domestic violence or sexual assault  
    Read More
  • Some lawmakers, sensing a tipping point, are backing the parents and teachers who complain about 'high stakes' tests   
    Read More
  • Watch Rachel Maddow interview VA Secretary Robert McDonald  
    Read More
load morehold SHIFT key to load allload all

(CNN) -- What's the one thing you would tell girls about education?

Think carefully about your answer; after all, it can be the most important factor in lifting a girl from poverty, mistreatment and drudgery into a fulfilling and rewarding life, for both her and her family.

This is the question we asked people from around the world to share with us as part of the premiere of CNN Films' "Girl Rising," airing in June, which follows nine remarkable young girls from Peru to Afghanistan in their brave quest for an education.

CNN received dozens of responses, many from people sharing moving personal stories of their own struggles or those of mothers and grandmothers who had sacrificed so much so that future generations of girls would grow up enriched by knowledge.

'Never stop trying'

In a small town called Sivakasi in southern India, poverty and hardship meant many young girls would trudge every morning not to school but to work in the city's matchmaking and firework industries.

Meera Vijayann, who is from Sivakasi but who studied and now lives in Bangalore, was all too aware of these girls and the life that lay ahead of them. But she was determined to fight for her education, eventually succeeding in becoming a writer and nongovernmental organization worker.

"Today, I feel proud that I had proved all those people wrong, despite coming from a small town where so many girls still face hardships in accessing a proper education," the 26-year-old said.

She says that from an early age, she knew she wanted more for her life, even though people made fun of her for wanting simply the freedom to choose. And she wants girls around the world to know that there is nothing to fear about wanting to learn.

"My message to girls around the world is to accept education but embrace knowledge. Always be open to learning, even when away from the classroom." Only then, she says, does a world of opportunity open up. "Never, no matter how hard, stop trying."

Choose your own destiny

Mexican Irene Moreno Jimenez said her thirst for knowledge was inspired by her mother, who died of cancer when Jimenez was 17 but who always instilled in her daughters a sense of purpose. "I have (the) freedom to choose my own destiny all because of her teachings," she said.

The 27-year-old now works in Washington as a communications consultant for a development bank, a job helping others in honor of her mother, who she says was a brave, generous and "visionary" leader who worked as a professor but gave her daughters lessons in life impossible to study through books. "She set the highest example on how to live and love for my sister and me," she said.

Despite losing her several years ago, Jimenez says, her mother lives on through her daughters' love of education and desire for other girls to know that the mind is a place where freedom is fought for -- and won.

"When you have education, you are free to think and to accomplish your thoughts," she said. "You are able to see possibilities where before there were walls. I have learned that you can lose it all, but you will never lose what's in your mind."

'Make your dreams come true'

A mother's inspiration was all Niena Sevilla from the Philippines needed to put her on the right path. Unable to attend high school due to poverty, her mother fought every step of the way to succeed.

"She had to plead for my grandfather's approval to let her go to the city so she could work and study later," the administrative assistant said. "At the age of 13, she worked at a gasoline station in our town, 30 minutes away from the farm. She had worked as a housekeeper and as a cook as well."

Through sheer determination and persistence, her mother managed to save precious funds for a vocational course in tailoring before opening a successful shop in her hometown. Sevilla, like many Filipinos, works thousands of miles from her own children. She works in Saudi Arabia to bring in an income for their future.

But she says her mother's struggles inspired her to instill in her own children a sense that education is not just about what degree you hold but the work you put in to achieve your goals. She wants other girls to feel the same.

"Knowing my mother's story makes me believe that education is not about holding a master's degree or college degree; it is about how you make your dreams come, regardless of what kind of education you have attained," she said.

'Strive hard'

As a proud father to 12-year-old Beatrice, Filipino salesman Rummel Pinera feels all too keenly that educating a girl is about ensuring her independence and improving society as a whole.

Beatrice, now a second-year high school student, inspired her father to hope that a solid education will provide her with a stable career and a chance to contribute to "the betterment of her village and society in general."

"Girls and women all over the world must strive hard to go to schools and finish their studies," he said, "because education would surely unlock their full potential of becoming achievers in their chosen vocations, careers and professions.

"An educated woman will surely contribute to the well-being of this planet and to overall human progress."

'Follow your heart'

But sometimes it's the simplest advice that is the most heartfelt and the most wise.

Andrea Barr is training to be an elementary school teacher at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. The 19-year-old also works at a summer camp in the area, teaching swimming and helps counsel young children, too. Despite her love of children, and of teaching, she faced pressure from family and friends over her career and life choices.

Undeterred, she enrolled at Bradley and fought to make her own way. Her struggles to choose her own path in life inspired her to provide a simple message for girls: "Follow your heart."

"Do not allow anyone to tell you what you can and cannot do," she said. "Do what you like, because that, in the end, will make you most happy. You are the sum of the choices you make."

 

Oregon Lottery

PHOTO GALLERY

Calendar

About Us

Breaking News

The Skanner TV

Turn the pages

Portland Opera Showboat 2