05-24-2017  4:28 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Merkley to Hold Town Hall in Clackamas County

Sen. Jeff Merkley to hold town hall in Clackamas County, May 30 ...

NAACP Monthly Meeting Notice, May 27, Portland

NAACP Portland invites the community to its monthly general membership meeting ...

Photos: Fundraiser for Sunshine Division's Assistance Programs

Under the Stars fundraiser took place on May 18 at the Melody Grand Ballroom ...

Portland Joins National Movement to End Prostate Cancer

Second annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk returns this June ...

Governor Kate Brown Signs Foster Children’s Sibling Bill of Rights

Current and former foster youth advocated for policy to maintain critical sibling relationships ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

CFPB Sues Ocwen Financial over Unfair Mortgage Practices

What many homeowners soon discover is that faithfully paying a monthly mortgage is in some cases, just not enough ...

B-CU Grads Protest Betsy “DeVoid” in Epic Fashion

Julianne Malveaux says that Betsy “DeVoid,” is no Mary McLeod Bethune ...

NAACP on Supreme Court's Decline to Review NC Voter ID Law

NAACP President and CEO Cornell William Brooks made the following remarks ...

To End AIDS in the United States, Stay True to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

Original convenors of National AIDS Strategy share thoughts on the way forward ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- While the average African American is feeling more financially secure, many still feel neglected by the financial industry, new research shows.

Half of African Americans say their financial situations have improved from a year ago, compared to 33% of the general population, according to a Prudential report released Tuesday. The survey polled 1,153 people who identified as African American or black and a general sampling of 471 Americans.

African Americans are also significantly more confident about making financial decisions. Nevertheless, they get 13% less contact from financial advisers, and only 26% of respondents feel that a financial firm has "effectively engaged and shown support for the African American community." As a result, only 19% have financial advisers, compared to 30% of the overall population.

Yet on average, African Americans find the financial industry to be more trustworthy than the general population does, and more than half say a financial adviser could help them -- making this underserved population an untapped opportunity for financial firms, Prudential found.

And the need for help is there.

Debt is the number one concern among the African American population, according to the survey. The median household had $18,000 in non-mortgage debt -- including student loans, credit cards and personal loans. That's 50% more than the general population. And those with college degrees were twice as likely to have student loan debt than the average college-educated American.

With higher debt, it's often harder to build savings. Median household savings is only $40,000 for African American households, compared to $97,000 nationally. When a college education is added to the equation, household savings rises to $66,000 for African American households but jumps to $207,000 for the average American household.

African American respondents were half as likely to have long-term investments like stocks, bonds and mutual funds. Yet they were significantly more likely to be financially supporting someone who is unemployed, as well as grandparents, parents, children and grandchildren.

 

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