03-18-2018  4:47 am      •     
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Yohlunda Mosley Named PSU’s New Assistant VP for Enrollment

New Assistant VP for Enrollment gets started at PSU on March 19 ...

Portland Parks & Recreation Celebrates Refugees & Immigrants March 16

Event takes place at East Portland Community Center ...

Rental Services Listening Session

Help shape Portland's rental housing policy ...

Oregon Historical Society Announces March Calendar of Events

Events include Latinas in Oregon History, Untold Stories of the Civil Rights Movement ...

Main Street Alliance of Oregon Hosts Small Business Candidate Forum

City council candidates discuss plans for small business community ...



Access to Safe, Decent and Affordable Housing Threatened

Trump era rollbacks in lending regulations could make life harder for Blacks in the housing market ...

Civility on Social Media Is Dead

Bill Fletcher discusses the lack of penalties for obnoxious behavior on social media ...

The Rise of the New Congolese Resistance

Protesters calling for free and fair elections have been met with violence by the Kabila government ...

The Student Loan Debt Crisis is a Civil Rights Issue

For Black students, the increased risk of defaulting on student loans is the direct result of inequities in financial resources ...



Chris Isidore CNN Money

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- College just isn't worth what it used to be.

A survey out Tuesday found that 41% of college graduates from the last two years are stuck in jobs that don't require a degree.

Consulting firm Accenture talked to 1,005 students who graduated from college in 2011 and 2012 and haven't returned to graduate school. In addition to those who are underemployed, 11% said they are unemployed, with 7% reporting they haven't had a job since graduating.

The lack of job options in their chosen fields are weighing grads down, as nearly half of the recent graduates believe they would fare better in the job market if they'd pursued a different major.

Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed said they would need additional training in order to start their chosen career, with 42% saying they expect to go to graduate school. That's a sharp change in thinking from those still in school: A separate survey by Accenture found that only 18% of the class of 2013 expects to need graduate school.

It will likely be much higher, as job prospects are grim for the class of 2013. The unemployment rate remains stubbornly high at 7.6%, and recent graduates fare even worse, according to the Labor Department.

The weak job market will continue to make things difficult for recent graduates, according to Katherine Lavelle, managing director of Accenture's Talent & Organization practice in North America.

"It's logical that if there are more meaningful jobs available, you will have fewer out in the market looking for those jobs," she said.

But she said even when the job market improves, there needs to be better coordination between employers and colleges about what skills new workers need to have.


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