05 24 2016
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  • The judge concluded Officer Edward Nero played little role in the arrest and wasn't responsible for the failure by police to buckle Gray in  
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  • Bill Cosby faces a preliminary hearing Tuesday to determine if his criminal sex-assault case in suburban Philadelphia goes to trial.Prosecutors had declined to charge the comedian-actor over the 2005 complaint, but arrested him in December after his explosive deposition in the woman's lawsuit became public. In the testimony given in that deposition, Cosby is grilled about giving drugs and alcohol to women before sex; making secret payments to ex-lovers; and hosting Andrea Constand at his home. They knew each other through Temple University, where he was a trustee and she managed the women's basketball team. Bill Cosby's wife refused to answer dozens of questions during a combative deposition in a defamation lawsuit filed by seven women who say the comedian branded them liars after they accused him of sexually assaulting them, according to a transcript released Friday. Camille Cosby was subjected to intense questioning by the women's lawyer, who repeatedly pressed her to say whether she believes her husband "acted with a lack of integrity" during their 52-year marriage. The lawyer also asked if her husband used his position and power "to manipulate young women." Camille Cosby didn't answer those questions and many others after her lawyer cited marital privilege, the legal protection given to communications between spouses. She repeatedly said she had "no opinion" when pressed on whether she viewed her husband's behavior as dishonest and a violation of their marriage vows. About 50 women have publicly accused Bill Cosby of forcing unwanted sexual contact on them decades ago. Cosby has denied the allegations. He faces a criminal case in Pennsylvania, where prosecutors have charged him with sexually violating a former Temple University employee, Andrea Constand. He has pleaded not guilty. Camille Cosby answered questions in the deposition Feb. 22 and again April 19 after her lawyers argued unsuccessfully to stop it. A judge ruled she would have to give a deposition but said she could refuse to answer questions about private communications between her and her husband. Camille Cosby's lawyer, Monique Pressley, repeatedly cited that privilege and advised her not to answer many questions asked by the women's lawyer, Joseph Cammarata. The exchanges between Cammarata and Cosby became testy at times, and she admonished him: "Don't lecture me. Just keep going with the questions." Using a transcript of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a civil lawsuit filed by Constand in 2005 and a transcript of an interview she gave to Oprah Winfrey in 2000, Cammarata asked Camille Cosby about extramarital affairs her husband had. "Were you aware of your husband setting up trusts for the benefit of women that he had a sexual relationship with?" Cammarata asked. She didn't answer after her lawyer cited marital privilege. Cammarata asked her about Shawn Thompson, a woman who said Bill Cosby fathered her daughter, Autumn Jackson, in the 1970s. Jackson was convicted in 1997 of attempting to extort money from Bill Cosby to prevent her from telling a tabloid she's his daughter. He acknowledged he had an affair with her mother and had given her money. "Was it a big deal when this came up in the 1970s that your husband had — big deal to you that your husband had an extramarital affair and potentially had a daughter from that extramarital affair?" Cammarata asked. "It was a big deal then, yes," Camille Cosby replied. She said she had "no opinion" on whether her husband's admission he obtained quaaludes to give to women with whom he wanted to have sex violated their marriage vows. Her lawyer objected and instructed her not to answer when Cammarata asked her if she ever suspected she had been given any type of drug to alter her state of consciousness when she had sex with her husband. A spokesman for the Cosbys declined to comment on her deposition. The Cosbys have a home in Shelburne Falls, an hour's drive from Springfield, where the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, was filed. An attorney handling a separate lawsuit against Bill Cosby revealed Friday that Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner provided sworn testimony Wednesday. In the sexual battery lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judy Huth says Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him at the Playboy Mansion around 1974, when she was 15. Bill Cosby's former lawyers have accused Huth of attempting to extort him before filing the case and have tried unsuccessfully to have it dismissed. Huth's attorney, Gloria Allred, said Hefner's testimony will remain under seal for now. Hefner also was named as a defendant in a case filed Monday by former model Chloe Goins, who accuses Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually abusing her at the Playboy Mansion in 2008.   The Associated Press generally doesn't identify people who say they're victims of sexual abuse, but the women accusing Cosby have come forward to tell their stories.___AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report from Los Angeles.
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  • Some hope killing will bring peace in Afghanistan     
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The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing has been moved from a Boston medical center to a federal Bureau of Prisons hospital about 40 miles away.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had been receiving treatment for a variety of wounds at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center since his capture nearly a week ago.

He is now at Federal Medical Center Devens, U.S. Marshals Service spokesman Drew Wade said Friday.

The prison hospital, located on the grounds of the former Fort Devens military base, is designed to house prisoners requiring ongoing medical care, according to the facility's website.

Tsarnaev, 19, was captured April 19 after a nearly 24-hour manhunt. According to the criminal complaint accusing him in the bombing, he had what appeared to be gunshot wounds to his head, neck, legs and hand. His brother, Tamerlan, died after a gun battle with police last week.

Authorities say the Tsarnaevs were responsible for twin blasts on April 15 that killed three people and injured more than 260, 14 of whom had limbs amputated.

Some of the wounded were treated at Beth Israel Deaconess, and were upset that the suspect in the bombing also was being treated there, a doctor with colleagues at the hospital told CNN's Elizabeth Cohen. Some felt anxiety and fear knowing the suspect in the bombing was in the building, the doctor said.

As of Thursday evening, 34 of the wounded were still being treated at Boston hospitals, including one patient in critical condition.

A law enforcement official told CNN Thursday that at least one of the two bombs, the second to explode, was detonated by remote control.

Spontaneous plan to attack New York City

On Thursday, officials revealed that New York City was the next target for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. It was a spontaneous idea, Tsarnaev told investigators from his hospital bed.

But a botched carjacking spoiled the impromptu road trip to Times Square, Tsarnaev said. They still had six improvised bombs at the time.

"We don't know that we would have been able to stop the terrorists had they arrived here from Boston," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. "We're just thankful that we didn't have to find out that answer."

Before forcing their way into the vehicle the night of April 18, the brothers shot dead a campus police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, police said.

The hijacked vehicle, a Mercedes SUV, ran low on fuel and they stopped at a service station, where the vehicle's owner escaped. Shortly thereafter, police picked up the trail of the SUV. A pursuit followed, during which, authorities say, the men were throwing the bombs out the vehicle's window at them. The gun battle and Tamerlan Tsarnaev's death followed.

A previous trip

There is no evidence that New York City remains a target of a terror attack stemming from the Boston bombings, New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said. Still, he said authorities are investigating two visits that the surviving suspect made to New York City last year.

In one of those trips, in April 2012, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was photographed in Times Square. Another person pictured in that photo has been in federal custody for seven days on alleged visa violations.

Federal agents detained that man and another person after swarming Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth residence hall during the search for him on April 19.

The two are foreign exchange students from Kazakhstan enrolled at the Dartmouth campus. Neither has been linked to the attack, but investigators hope they can better piece together the suspects' movements before and after the marathon.

"These guys are not being cut loose immediately, and there's a reason why," the federal law enforcement source said.

Father's visit delayed

Meanwhile the Tsarnaev brothers' parents have left their home in Dagestan for another part of Russia, their mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaev, told CNN Friday.

She said the suspects' father, Anzor Tsarnaev, is delaying his planned trip to the United States indefinitely.

She told CNN's Nick Paton Walsh that her husband was delaying the trip for health reasons. She wouldn't elaborate.

Anzor Tsarnaev had earlier agreed to fly to the United States after FBI agents and Russian officials spoke with them for hours this week at the family's home.

The mother also will not be flying to the United States, where she is wanted on felony charges of shoplifting and destruction of property.

The family lived in Massachusetts before Zubeidat Tsarnaev jumped bail after her arrest on the charges in 2012. The parents moved to Dagestan that year.

Sources: Russia raised concerns about mother, son

Zubeidat and Tamerlan Tsarnaev had previously fallen under the suspicion of Russian authorities concerned they were following radical ideologies.

Russian authorities had raised concerns to U.S. authorities about her and her son, sources told CNN. But a U.S. official said that the Russian's case at the time was "thin."

Zubeidat Tsarnaev said the FBI had visited her family "several times" in 2011 with questions about her older son's "Islamic interests."

U.S. authorities did add Zubeidat Tsarnaev and her older son to the Terrorist Identities Datamart Environment, or TIDE, database in 2011 -- a collection of more than a half million names maintained by the National Counterterrorism Center, an intelligence official said.

Zubeidat Tsarnaev told CNN on Thursday that she didn't want to accept the reality of the bombing, saying it was fake. She has seen a video pushing the wild idea, she said, adding that there was no blood and that paint was used instead.

Nonetheless, she broke down when she spoke of the victims.

"I really feel sorry for all of them. Really feel sorry for all of them," she said, her voice cracking even as she remained resolute that her sons were not involved.

The Tsarnaevs are originally from the embattled Russian republic of Chechnya but fled from the brutal wars there in the 1990s. The two brothers were born in Kyrgyzstan and moved at different times to the United States.

Putin: 'We were right'

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday urged closer cooperation between other countries' security services in the wake of the Boston attack.

"If we combine our efforts, we will not suffer blows like that," he said during a live televised call-in session in Moscow on Thursday.

In his first on-camera comments since the bombing, Putin also lashed out against those in the West who have slammed Russia for human rights abuses in its actions toward Chechnya.

"Russia is among the first victims, and I hate it when our Western partners call our terrorists -- who committed some heinous crimes in Russia -- when they call them freedom fighters and never call them terrorists. They supported them," said Putin, accusing unnamed people or groups of providing Russia's foes with political, financial and "media" support.

U.S. authorities have come under fire at home, with lawmakers asking if the FBI and CIA failed to share information. Sources told CNN that Russia had separately asked the FBI and the CIA to look into Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011.

CNN's Drew Griffin, Dave Alsup, Carol Cratty, Nick Paton Walsh, Brian Todd, Barbara Starr, Susan Candiotti and Ben Brumfield contributed to this report.

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