07-22-2017  5:50 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Augustana Lutheran Church Hosts Summer in the City Aug. 6

Free event includes BBQ, book sale, children’s games, music ...

Health Officials Warn of Spike in Heroin Overdoses

Emergency providers urge use of nalaxone, which is available without a prescription ...

Students Reach New Heights

Two rising sophomores attend aviation camp in Vancouver, Wash. ...

Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways

This summer the eight-mile bike route takes place on July 23, from 11 a.m - 4 p.m. ...

APANO: Cultural Series Launches with Solidarity Film Screening

"American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs" screens on July 25 at North Portland Library ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

Nooses on National Mall Echo Domestic Terrorism

Lauren Victoria Burke reports on a series of domestic terrorist attacks across the U.S ...

White House Proposes $9.2 Billion Cut in Education Funding

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes about the rising costs of higher education ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- It's getting costlier to keep your car, according to data from the car repair Web site CarMD.

Auto repair costs rose 10% in 2012, the first such increase in 6 years.

Among the reasons is that our cars are getting older. The average car on America's roads is now over 11 years old. Last year's record heat may also have been a factor, according to CarMD. Heat places a strain on cooling systems, batteries, fluids and transmissions.

CarMD bases its annual report on information gathered from vehicles' on-board computers downloaded by a network of repair shops. CarMD also sells a device that allows drivers to read data from their own cars' on-board computer systems.

The ability to read that information can be helpful, especially when the always-perplexing "check engine" light comes on in the dashboard.

The most common cause for the warning light to come on is a faulty oxygen sensor. Ignoring that warning light could be expensive. If left untreated, a bad oxygen sensor can cost drivers about $900 a year in wasted gasoline, according to CarMD.

The oxygen sensor detects how much air is going through the car's engine. A faulty reading could lead to too much fuel being pumped in and, therefore, lower fuel economy. On average, it costs about $294 to replace the oxygen sensor.

The second most common cause is a loose or broken gas cap, a relatively cheap fix, which can have a slight impact on a vehicle's fuel efficiency.

The third most common cause for the warning light to come on was a faulty catalytic converter. The catalytic converter cleans exhaust gases as they leave the engine. Usually, a catalytic converter won't fail unless some other problem part, such as a bad oxygen sensor, has been ignored for too long.

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