04-19-2018  12:44 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

April 24 is Voter Registration Deadline for May 15 Primary Election

Tuesday, April 24, is voter registration and party choice deadline for May 15 Primary Election ...

Portland Libraries Celebrate National Poetry Month

April poetry events and recommended reading from Multnomah County libraries ...

PCRI Launches the Pathway 1000 Implementation Plan

Pathway 1000 a bold and ambitious 10-year displacement mitigation initiative ...

AG Rosenblum Launches New Resource on Oregon’s New Gun Safety Laws

One-page handout aims to educate Oregonians about the new law ...

Ethos Music Center Honors Portland Attorney Dave Baca with Annual Resonance Award

Founder Charles Lewis to receive first-ever Ethos Visionary Award at the May 2 event ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Will HUD Secretary Ben Carson Enforce the Fair Housing Act?

Julianne Malveaux questions HUD Secretary Ben Carson’s ability to enforce the Fair Housing Act ...

Waiting While Black in Philadelphia Can Get You Arrested

Reggie Shuford on the daily indignities African-Americans face in Philadelphia and around the country ...

Black People Must Vote or Reap the Consequences

Jeffrey Boney on the importance of voting in the Black community ...

Civil Rights Community Doesn’t Need to Look Farr for Racism in Trump Court Nominees

Derrick Johnson, NAACP President and CEO, explains organization's opposition to Trump's nomination of Thomas Farr ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Bill Mears CNN Supreme Court Producer

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Supreme Court will wade once again into the politically tricky issue of campaign finance laws, agreeing to hear a challenge to individual donation limits in federal election campaigns.

At issue is whether strict limits on direct campaign contributions by individuals-- in the Federal Election Campaign Act-- violate the First Amendment. Oral arguments will be held in the fall.

The appeal comes from Alabama donor Shaun McCutcheon, supported in court by the Republican National Committee. They object to a 1970s-era law restricting someone from giving no more than $46,200 to federal candidates, and $70,800 to political action committees, during a two-year election cycle.

McCutcheon says he has a constitutional right to donate over that amount to as many candidates as he wants, so long as no one candidate gets more than the current $2500 limit.

Lower federal courts have rejected his appeal.

This case deals with political contributions. A separate 2010 high court case dealt with campaign spending by outside groups, seeking to influence federal elections. There, the conservative majority-- citing free speech concerns-- eased long-standing restrictions on "independent spending" by corporations, labor unions, and certain non-profit advocacy groups in political campaigns.

The so-called "Citizens United" ruling helped open the floodgates to massive corporate spending in the 2012 elections and gave birth to super PACs - and trumps state laws. It also led to further litigation seeking to loosen current restrictions on both the spending and donations areas.

Supporters of campaign finance reform say such laws are designed to prevent corruption in politics. Opponents said it would criminalize free speech and association.

The case is McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission (12-536).

 

Oregon Lottery
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Report