07-29-2017  4:59 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

PCC Board Refers Bond Renewal Measure to Nov. Ballot

If renewed, the bond will fund improvements to PCC ...

Organizers Announce Aug. 6 March for Freedom, Solidarity and Justice

Endorsers include Portland Interfaith Clergy Resistance, VOZ Workers Rights Education Project and Council on American Islamic...

PAM Presents African American Portraits

Exhibit demonstrates diversity of the African American experience, late 1800s to 1990s ...

Humboldt Sewer Repair Project Update

Construction continues on a project repairing more than three miles of public sewer pipes ...

Augustana Lutheran Church Hosts Summer in the City Aug. 6

Free event includes BBQ, book sale, children’s games, music ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Welcoming Immigrants Keeps America Great

Trump’s plan to bar immigrants from six predominantly Muslim countries is unlawful and un-American ...

EDITORIAL: It’s Time to Sunset the 48-Hour Rule

This week Mayor Ted Wheeler will ask Portland City Commissioners to end the hated 48-hour rule ...

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Barack Obama signed into law Sunday a $9.7 billion Superstorm Sandy aid package following delays over fiscal cliff bickering, warnings of dwindling federal funds and swirling controversy over millions of dollars for unrelated projects.

The measure passed the House on Friday, 354-67. The Senate approved the measure unanimously and without debate. The new law includes more than $9 billion to help the government pay flood insurance claims.

Congress faced strong pressure to boost the debt-ridden flood insurance program, which is the primary option for that type of coverage for U.S. homeowners and businesses. It has been under severe financial pressure for years from payouts related to big storms like Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

It was the first legislative action of the new Congress, which picked up the Sandy package after the previous session on Tuesday shelved a vote on a much larger assistance plan for storm victims, infuriating New York and New Jersey politicians.

Lawmakers from both houses will weigh in on $51 billion in additional Sandy aid on January 15. But that larger portion will likely face much closer scrutiny in a Congress anticipating more acrimony over spending and debt in coming months.

House leaders initially balked at immediate consideration of a big spending bill just after concluding the excruciating negotiations around the fiscal cliff. House Speaker John Boehner preferred to wait a few days at least before holding a vote on a Sandy bill.

The original storm legislation also included what some Republicans saw as congressional "pork," or money for unrelated pet projects. Budget hawks viewed the extra funding as wasteful in an era of record deficits.

CNN's Halimah Abdullah and Kevin Liptak contributed to this report.

™ & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

 

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