04 21 2015
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  • When should we use military to enforce US goals? NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Rand Paul lashed out Saturday at military hawks in the Republican Party in a clash over foreign policy dividing the packed GOP presidential field. Paul, a first-term senator from Kentucky who favors a smaller U.S. footprint in the world, said that some of his Republican colleagues would do more harm in international affairs than would leading Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton. "The other Republicans will criticize the president and Hillary Clinton for their foreign policy, but they would just have done the same thing — just 10 times over," Paul said on the closing day of a New Hampshire GOP conference that brought about 20 presidential prospects to the first-in-the-nation primary state. "There's a group of folks in our party who would have troops in six countries right now, maybe more," Paul said. Foreign policy looms large in the presidential race as the U.S. struggles to resolve diplomatic and military conflicts across the globe. The GOP presidential class regularly rails against President Barack Obama's leadership on the world stage, yet some would-be contenders have yet to articulate their own positions, while others offered sharply different visions. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, whose brother, President George W. Bush, authorized the 2003 invasion of Iraq, declined to say whether he would have done anything different then. Yet Jeb Bush acknowledged a shift in his party against new military action abroad. "Our enemies need to fear us, a little bit, just enough for them to deter the actions that create insecurity," Bush said earlier in the conference. He said restoring alliances "that will create less likelihood of America's boots on the ground has to be the priority, the first priority of the next president." The GOP's hawks were well represented at the event, led by Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has limited foreign policy experience but articulated a muscular vision during his Saturday keynote address. Walker said the threats posed by radical Islamic terrorism won't be handled simply with "a couple bombings." "We're not going to wait till they bring the fight to us," Walker said. "We're going to bring the fight to them and fight on their soil." South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham addressed the question of putting U.S. troops directly in the battle against the Islamic State group militants by saying there is only one way to defeat the militants: "You go over there and you fight them so they don't come here." Texas Sen. Ted Cruz suggested an aggressive approach as well. "The way to defeat ISIS is a simple and clear military objective," he said. "We will destroy them." Businesswoman Carly Fiorina offered a similar outlook. "The world is a more dangerous and more tragic place when America is not leading. And America has not led for quite some time," she said. Under Obama, a U.S.-led coalition of Western and Arab countries is conducting regular airstrikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. also has hundreds of military advisers in Iraq helping Iraqi security forces plan operations against the Islamic State, which occupies large chunks of northern and western Iraq. Paul didn't totally reject the use of military force, noting that he recently introduced a declaration of war against the Islamic State group. But in an interview with The Associated Press, he emphasized the importance of diplomacy. He singled out Russia and China, which have complicated relationships with the U.S., as countries that could contribute to U.S. foreign policy interests. "I think the Russians and the Chinese have great potential to help make the world a better place," he said. "I don't say that naively that they're going to, but they have the potential to." Paul suggested the Russians could help by getting Syrian President Bashar Assad to leave power. "Maybe he goes to Russia," Paul said. Despite tensions with the U.S., Russia and China negotiated alongside Washington in nuclear talks with Iran. Paul has said he is keeping an open mind about the nuclear negotiations. "The people who already are very skeptical, very doubtful, may not like the president for partisan reasons," he said, and "just may want war instead of negotiations."
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LONDON (CNN) -- Celebrated "Harry Potter" author J.K. Rowling has said she feels "duped and angry" over British Prime Minister David Cameron's response to a major inquiry into phone hacking and other abuses by the press.


Rowling was one of hundreds of witnesses to testify to the Leveson Inquiry into media standards and ethics, set up in the wake of a phone-hacking scandal at Rupert Murdoch's News of the World tabloid.


The judge who led the inquiry, Lord Justice Leveson, released his long-awaited report Thursday, in which he recommended an independent regulator be set up by the press, which would be backed by new laws to make sure it meets certain standards.


Cameron, of the Conservative Party, supported Brian Leveson's call for an independent regulator -- but said he was not convinced that legislation is needed to underpin the new body.


Rowling expressed her disappointment in the prime minister's decision in a statement posted Friday on the website of Hacked Off, a group campaigning for media reform.


"Having taken David Cameron's assurances in good faith at the outset of the inquiry he set up, I am merely one among many who feel duped and angry in its wake," she wrote. 


"I thought long and hard about the possible consequences to my family of giving evidence and finally decided to do so because I have made every possible attempt to protect my children's privacy under the present system, and failed."


Rowling is concerned that members of the public who do not have the money to fight the press in the courts, over such abuses as invasion of privacy or libel, will continue to suffer.


"Those who have suffered the worst, most painful and least justifiable kinds of mistreatment at the hands of the press, people who have become newsworthy because of the press's own errors or through unspeakable private tragedy, are those least likely to be able to defend themselves or to seek proper redress," she said.



"Without statutory underpinning Leveson's recommendations will not work. We will be left with yet another voluntary system from which the press can walk away."



The author also questioned why millions of pounds had been spent on the inquiry if the prime minister did not intend to follow its recommendations -- and urged people to sign a petition set up by Hacked Off if they agreed.



The group has already collected more than 50,000 signatures from members of the public in support of the full implementation of Leveson's recommendations.



Cameron's decision caused immediate divisions within the country's coalition government.



Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, who leads the Liberal Democrats in the coalition, said he believes new legislation is needed to ensure the regulator's long-term independence.



Ed Miliband, leader of the opposition Labour Party, also said he favors full implementation of Leveson's recommendations, including the new legislation.



In his report, Leveson said that he had no desire to jeopardize the freedom of the press, which he acknowledged plays a "vital" role in safeguarding the public interest, but that changes are needed to tackle abuses.



The British press has ignored its own code of conduct on "far too many occasions over the last decade," causing "real hardship" and sometimes wreaking "havoc with the lives of innocent people," Leveson said.



The independent inquiry was first announced by Cameron in July 2011 in response to public outrage over a newspaper phone-hacking scandal.



The trigger was the allegation that in 2002, the voice mail of a missing 13-year-old girl, Milly Dowler, had been hacked by an investigator working for the News of the World before she was found murdered. The furor led to the closure of the newspaper, run by News International, a subsidiary of the Murdoch-owned News Corp.



CNN's Per Nyberg contributed to this report.



 ™ & © 2012 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved. 



  

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