11-20-2017  12:53 pm      •     
MLK Breakfast
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NEWS BRIEFS

SEI, Sunshine Division Offer Thanksgiving Meals to Families in Need

Turkeys are being provided to fill 200 Thanksgiving food boxes for SEI families ...

NAACP Portland Monthly Meeting Nov. 18

Monthly general membership meeting takes place on Saturday, 12 - 2 p.m. ...

Multnomah County Animal Services Waives Adoption Fees Nov. 17

Special runs from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday ...

Fitzpatrick Presents 'Pathway 1000' Plan Before City Council

Plan would restore involuntary displacement by building 80 homes per year ...

Sisters Network to Hold Monthly Meeting Nov. 11

Meeting to take place Saturday morning at June Key Delta Center ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Local Author Visits North Portland Library

Renee Watson teaches students and educators about the power of writing ...

Is the FBI’s New Focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the New COINTELPRO?

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.) talks about the FBI’s misguided report on “Black Identity Extremism” and negative Facebook ads. ...

ACA Enrollment Surging, Even Though It Ends Dec. 15

NNPA contributing writer Cash Michaels writes about enrollment efforts ...

Blacks Often Pay Higher Fees for Car Purchases than Whites

Charlene Crowell explains why Black consumers often pay higher fees than White consumers, because of “add-on” products. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

CNN Wire Staff

(CNN) -- The U.S. Supreme Court has denied an appeal by Chevron to block an $18 billion judgment against it in an Ecuadorian court.

The high court gave no explanation behind its decision not to consider the appeal from the oil giant.

The case, Chevron Corp v. Naranjo et al, stems from a 2011 injunction against enforcement of any judgments against the company related to lawsuits in Ecuador. A judge initially granted the injunction, but in January of this year an appeals court reversed the lower court's finding, removing the injunction.

What the Supreme Court announced on Tuesday was that it would not consider Chevron's appeal to reinstate the injunction.

An Ecuadorian court had ruled that Chevron must pay $8.6 billion in damages relating to a pollution lawsuit, an amount that increased to $18 billion because Chevron did not apologize.

In Ecuador, Chevron has appealed to the country's National Court, and in the United States it sought to reinstate the injunction against enforcement of the Ecuadorian ruling.

Chevron noted the Supreme Court ruling was not based on the merits of the case, and does not undo findings by another court that "fraud and bias have tainted the Ecuadorian proceedings and judgment."

"While Chevron is disappointed that the court denied the petition, Chevron will continue to defend against the plaintiffs' lawyers' attempts to enforce the fraudulent Ecuadorian judgment," the company said on a blog it devotes to the case.

Chevron's legal fight in Ecuador involves litigation that goes back 19 years between residents of Ecuador's Amazon region and Texaco, which was later purchased by Chevron.

The pollution case stems from claims that the company had a detrimental impact on Amazonian communities where it operated.

The company alleges that reports and evidence against it were fraudulent, and that bribes and corruption led to the original decision against it.

That case, Aguinda v. ChevronTexaco, was originally filed in New York in 1993 on behalf of 30,000 inhabitants of Ecuador's Amazon region. The suit was eventually transferred to the Ecuadorian court and Ecuadorian jurisdiction.

The lawsuit alleges that Texaco used a variety of substandard production practices in Ecuador that resulted in pollution that decimated several indigenous groups in the area, according to a fact sheet provided by the Amazon Defense Coalition.

According to the group, Texaco dumped more than 18 billion gallons of toxic waste into Amazon waterways, abandoned more than 900 waste pits, burned millions of cubic meters of gases with no controls and spilled more than 17 million gallons of oil due to pipeline ruptures.

Cancer and other health problems were reported at higher rates in the area, the group says.

Chevron says Texaco was partnered with an Ecuadorian oil company when it operated in Ecuador, and that it spent $40 million on remediation efforts to clean up roughly one-third of the sites in which it worked -- an amount reflective of its 37% share of the oil-producing consortium with Petroecuador.

It says its cleanup efforts were certified and approved by the Ecuadorian government and blames Petroecuador for any ongoing pollution at sites where it was the sole operator, according to documents on the Chevron website regarding the lawsuit and its history of operations in the South American country.

 

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