05-27-2017  10:49 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Art Museum Hosts Upstanders Festival May 27

Event includes spoken word, workshops and poster making in support of social justice ...

North Portland Library Announces June Computer Classes

Upcoming courses include Introduction to Spreadsheets, What is the Cloud? and Learn Programming with Games ...

Merkley to Hold Town Hall in Clackamas County

Sen. Jeff Merkley to hold town hall in Clackamas County, May 30 ...

NAACP Monthly Meeting Notice, May 27, Portland

NAACP Portland invites the community to its monthly general membership meeting ...

Photos: Fundraiser for Sunshine Division's Assistance Programs

Under the Stars fundraiser took place on May 18 at the Melody Grand Ballroom ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Ensuring the Promise of the Every Student Succeeds Act

The preservation of Thurgood Marshall's legacy is dependent upon our dedication to our children ...

CFPB Sues Ocwen Financial over Unfair Mortgage Practices

What many homeowners soon discover is that faithfully paying a monthly mortgage is in some cases, just not enough ...

B-CU Grads Protest Betsy “DeVoid” in Epic Fashion

Julianne Malveaux says that Betsy “DeVoid,” is no Mary McLeod Bethune ...

NAACP on Supreme Court's Decline to Review NC Voter ID Law

NAACP President and CEO Cornell William Brooks made the following remarks ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

BUENOS AIRES (CNN) -- The face of Argentina's most famous first lady is part of a new design for the country's currency.

Eva Peron -- better known by her nickname, Evita -- will be on new 100-peso bills released into circulation in the coming weeks, Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner announced Wednesday.

"It's not that Eva was perfect or a saint, quite the opposite. What made her into something greater, more unforgettable and immortal is that she was a humble woman of the people who had the great luck to meet a man and a people," Fernandez said as she unveiled the new design.

The new design marks the first time a woman will appear on an Argentinian bill in 200 years, she said.

The announcement came on the eve of a series of events Thursday commemorating the 60th anniversary of the death of Peron, who was Argentina's first lady from 1946 until 1952.

As first lady, Maria Eva Duarte de Peron championed the rights of the poor, pushed for more social programs and argued for women's suffrage, drawing criticism from members of Argentina's political establishment and its upper class.

Decades after her death, she continues to spark criticism from opponents and devotion from supporters in the South American country.

She has also captured the interest of people beyond Argentina's borders, many of whom know her story from the 1978 Andrew Lloyd Webber musical "Evita" and its 1996 movie adaptation, which starred Madonna and Antonio Banderas. Singer Ricky Martin is currently performing in a Broadway revival of the show.

In recent years, some have compared Peron with Argentina's current president, who was first lady for four years during the presidency of her late husband Nestor Kirchner, who was president from 2003-2007 and died in 2010.

"Both of them were first ladies. Both of them were accused of influencing the governments of their husbands when they were first ladies. I think both of them are very beloved by humble people and are very popular among them, and also resisted by the most powerful," said Araceli Bellota, a journalist and historian.

Evita's mythological status comes from a combination of factors, historian Felipe Pigna said, dating back to the disappearance of her cadaver during the country's military dictatorship.

"The disappearance of her body, the marked hatred from her enemies, who evidently speak of a person who continues worrying them, someone they are still afraid of even after her death," he said.

In Buenos Aires Thursday, tourists streamed into to a museum commemorating Evita's life, visiting a building that was once a shelter for children run by Peron's foundation.

Some said they were visiting from abroad. Others who grew up in Argentina shared personal recollections of the former first lady.

"I remember when she stopped at the corner by my house handing out toys, and I can attest that we would go and they would give us bicycles, toys, whatever we wanted. And they didn't ask anything of us," said Argentinian Irene Piergiovani.

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