11-23-2017  8:10 pm      •     
Happy Thanksgiving
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NEWS BRIEFS

Kenton Library Hosts African American Genealogy Event Dec. 2

Stephen Hanks to present on genealogy resources and methods ...

PSU Hires New Police Chief

Donnell Tanksley brings policing philosophy rooted in community engagement to PSU ...

African American Portraits Exhibit at PAM Ends Dec. 29

Towards the end of its six month run, exhibit conveys the Black experience, late 1800s - 1990s ...

SEI, Sunshine Division Offer Thanksgiving Meals to Families in Need

Turkeys are being provided to fill 200 Thanksgiving food boxes for SEI families ...

NAACP Portland Monthly Meeting Nov. 18

Monthly general membership meeting takes place on Saturday, 12 - 2 p.m. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Black Celebrities, Athletes and Politicians Must Respect the Black Press

Rosetta Miller-Perry discusses how Black celebrities snub the Black Press when they get “discovered” by the mainstream media ...

Local Author Visits North Portland Library

Renee Watson teaches students and educators about the power of writing ...

Is the FBI’s New Focus on “Black Identity Extremists” the New COINTELPRO?

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.) talks about the FBI’s misguided report on “Black Identity Extremism” and negative Facebook ads. ...

ACA Enrollment Surging, Even Though It Ends Dec. 15

NNPA contributing writer Cash Michaels writes about enrollment efforts ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

Christopher Leonard AP Agribusiness Writer

ST. LOUIS (AP) -- The U.S. government barely changed its estimate for next year's corn surplus, which is expected to stay small and keep high food prices high.

The Department of Agriculture estimated Friday that farmers will have 848 million bushels of corn on hand at the end of next summer. That's up less than 1 percent from last month's forecast.

Next year's surplus would satisfy demand for fewer than 25 days. A 30-day supply is considered healthy.

Higher corn prices have pushed overall food inflation up this year. Corn is an ingredient in everything from animal feed to cereal to soft drinks. The USDA expects food prices to have increased 4.5 percent in 2011. They estimate prices will rise as much as 3.5 percent next year.

Fears of a corn shortage pushed the price to a record high of $7.99 a bushel in June. Corn prices have eased slightly since then to around $6 per bushel.

Corn traded for about $2 a bushel for several years until 2005. Government mandates and subsidies that year helped the ethanol businesses expand.

The surplus is at historically low levels because of increased demand from ethanol makers and also from livestock producers.

Separately, the USDA said it expected the soybean surplus to be about 18 percent bigger in 2012 than it thought last month. Farmers are expected to have 230 million bushels on hand. That's about a 28 day supply. While not abundant, most traders don't consider that level a shortage, said Jason Ward, an analyst with analyst with Northstar Commodity in Minneapolis.

Soybeans traded for more than $14 a bushel this summer, but now trade around $11.30 a bushel.

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