07-20-2017  7:49 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways

This summer the eight-mile bike route takes place on July 23, from 11 a.m - 4 p.m. ...

APANO: Cultural Series Launches with Solidarity Film Screening

"American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs" screens on July 25 at North Portland Library ...

National Hunger Hotline Seeks to Reach More Children in Need

Callers can locate summer meals sites for kids, food pantries, and other meals programs near them ...

ICS Announces New Executive Director

Lisa LeSage has been named the new Executive Director of Immigration Counseling Service ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

OPINION

Throw the Doors of Opportunity Wide Open for Our Youth

Congressional Black Caucus member Robin Kelly says it’s time to pass the “Today’s American Dream Act.” ...

Trump’s Proposed Budget Cuts Threaten Civil Rights

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending talks about the impact of President Trump’s budget on civil rights...

Nooses on National Mall Echo Domestic Terrorism

Lauren Victoria Burke reports on a series of domestic terrorist attacks across the U.S ...

White House Proposes $9.2 Billion Cut in Education Funding

Charlene Crowell of the Center for Responsible Lending writes about the rising costs of higher education ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- The doctor whose fertility treatments gave "Octomom" Nadya Suleman her octuplets and six other children wants to practice medicine again and asked a court to reconsider the revocation of his license by the state medical board.

In court papers, Dr. Michael Kamrava blamed what he calls negative media coverage for the Medical Board of California's decision to revoke his license, saying he was vilified in a way not justified by the evidence.

"Dr. Kamrava performed a perfectly legal procedure, but the public (or at least the media) thought that the procedure was repugnant," the filing said.

A hearing on the request was delayed Wednesday until Dec. 15 in Superior Court.

The license of the Beverly Hills fertility doctor has been revoked since July 1. In its decision, the medial board found Kamrava grossly negligent in the care of three patients, including Suleman.

The court can ask the medical board to reconsider its decision, but the ultimate licensing authority lies with the board. By law, Kamrava can petition the board for reinstatement three years after revocation takes effect.

Suleman initially told the media she had been implanted with six embryos and two of them split, resulting in her octuplets. However, medical records discussed during Kamrava's licensing hearing revealed she had been implanted with 12 embryos.

During the hearing last year, Kamrava tearfully apologized for implanting so many embryos into Suleman, saying he felt bound to do it because she was so insistent.

The number of implanted embryos was six times the norm for a woman her age, and the resulting pregnancy could have been deadly or damaging for Suleman and her babies.

Crowding in a mother's uterus can result in premature birth, cerebral palsy, developmental delays or other health problems for the babies.

Born in Jan. 2009, Suleman's octuplets broke a world record for longest-surviving octuplets because they all lived past one week.

The babies - whose birth weights ranged from 1 pound, 8 ounces to 3 pounds, 4 ounces - spent their first weeks in the neonatal intensive care unit at Kaiser Permanente Bellflower Medical Center.

She has said her octuplets are healthy.

In addition to the octuplets, Suleman has six other children conceived through Kamrava's in vitro treatments.

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