07-18-2024  8:00 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather

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NORTHWEST NEWS

Money From Washington's Landmark Climate Law Will Help Tribes Face Rising Seas, Climate Change

Tens of millions of dollars raised by a landmark climate law in Washington state will go to Native American tribes that are at risk from climate change and rising sea levels to help them move to higher ground, install solar panels, buy electric vehicles and restore wetlands. The Quinault Indian Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula is getting million to help relocate its two main villages to higher ground, away from the tsunami zone and persistent flooding.

The Top Draft Pick of the Mariners Pitches Lefty and Righty. Jurrangelo Cijntje Wants to Keep It Up

Cijntje threw right-handed to lefties more often in 2024 but said it was because of discomfort in his left side. The Mariners say they want Cijntje to decide how to proceed as a righty and/or lefty as a pro. He says he wants to continue pitching from both sides.

Wildfire Risk Rises as Western States Dry out Amid Ongoing Heat Wave Baking Most of the US

Blazes are burning in Oregon, where the governor issued an emergency authorization allowing additional firefighting resources to be deployed. More than 142 million people around the U.S. were under heat alerts Wednesday, especially across the West, where dozens of locations tied or broke heat records.

Forum Explores Dangerous Intersection of Brain Injury and Law Enforcement

The Portland Committee on Community-Engaged Policing hosted event with medical, legal and first-hand perspectives.

NEWS BRIEFS

UNCF Celebrating 80 Years of Transforming Lives

The UNCF Each One Teach One Luncheon is Sunday, July 21, 2-5 p.m., Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center. ...

Interstate Bridge Replacement Program Awarded $1.499 Billion

Federal support again demonstrates multimodal replacement of the Interstate Bridge is a national priority ...

Echohawk Selected for Small Business Regulatory Fairness Board

Indigenous woman and executive leader of Snoqualmie-owned enterprise to serve on national board advancing regulatory fairness and...

HUD Reaches Settlement to Ensure Equal Opportunity in the Appraisal Profession

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced today that it has entered into an historic Conciliation...

HUD Expands Program to Help Homeowners Repair Homes

The newly updated Federal Housing Administration Program will assist families looking for affordable financing to repair, purchase, or...

Oregon authorities recover body of award-winning chef who drowned in river accident

CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) — Oregon authorities said Wednesday that they have recovered the body of award-winning chef Naomi Pomeroy following her drowning in a river accident. The Benton County Sheriff's Office said it located her body Wednesday morning in the Willamette River between...

Aging bridges in 16 states will be improved or replaced with the help of B in federal funding

Dozens of aging bridges in 16 states will be replaced or improved with the help of billion in federal grants announced Wednesday by President Joe Biden's administration, the latest beneficiaries of a massive infrastructure law. The projects range from coast to coast, with the...

Missouri governor says new public aid plan in the works for Chiefs, Royals stadiums

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Thursday that he expects the state to put together an aid plan by the end of the year to try to keep the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals from being lured across state lines to new stadiums in Kansas. Missouri's renewed efforts...

Kansas governor signs bills enabling effort to entice Chiefs and Royals with new stadiums

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas' governor signed legislation Friday enabling the state to lure the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs and Major League Baseball's Royals away from neighboring Missouri by helping the teams pay for new stadiums. Gov. Laura Kelly's action came three days...

OPINION

The 900-Page Guide to Snuffing Out American Democracy

What if there was a blueprint for a future presidential administration to unilaterally lay waste to our constitutional order and turn America from a democracy into an autocracy in one fell swoop? That is what one far-right think tank and its contributors...

SCOTUS Decision Seizes Power to Decide Federal Regulations: Hard-Fought Consumer Victories Now at Risk

For Black and Latino Americans, this power-grab by the court throws into doubt and potentially weakens current agency rules that sought to bring us closer to the nation’s promises of freedom and justice for all. In two particular areas – fair housing and...

Minding the Debate: What’s Happening to Our Brains During Election Season

The June 27 presidential debate is the real start of the election season, when more Americans start to pay attention. It’s when partisan rhetoric runs hot and emotions run high. It’s also a chance for us, as members of a democratic republic. How? By...

State of the Nation’s Housing 2024: The Cost of the American Dream Jumped 47 Percent Since 2020

Only 1 in 7 renters can afford homeownership, homelessness at an all-time high ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

New Mexico governor cites 'dangerous intersection' of crime and homelessness, wants lawmakers to act

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Citing what she calls the “dangerous intersection” of crime and homelessness, New Mexico's governor is calling on lawmakers to address stubbornly high crime rates as they convene Thursday for a special legislative session. In issuing her proclamation, Gov....

City council vote could enable a new Tampa Bay Rays ballpark — and the old site's transformation

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A key city council vote Thursday on a major redevelopment project in St. Petersburg could pave the way to give baseball's Tampa Bay Rays a new ballpark, which would guarantee the team stays for at least 30 years. The .5 billion project, supporters say,...

John Deere ends support of 'social or cultural awareness' events, distances from inclusion efforts

NEW YORK (AP) — Farm equipment maker John Deere says it will no longer sponsor “social or cultural awareness” events, becoming the latest major U.S. company to distance itself from diversity and inclusion measures after being targeted by conservative backlash. In a statement...

ENTERTAINMENT

On anniversary of Frida Kahlo's death, her art's spirituality keeps fans engaged around the globe

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Frida Kahlo had no religious affiliation. Why, then, did the Mexican artist depict several religious symbols in the paintings she produced until her death on July 13, 1954? “Frida conveyed the power of each individual,” said art researcher and curator Ximena...

Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 21-27

Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 21-27: July 21: Actor Leigh Lawson (“Tess”) is 81. Singer Yusuf Islam (Cat Stevens) is 76. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau (“Doonesbury”) is 76. Actor Jamey Sheridan (“Homeland”) is 73. Singer-guitarist Eric Bazilian of The Hooters is 71....

Canadian officer says Alice Munro claimed her daughter was lying about being abused by stepfather

TORONTO (AP) — A retired police detective involved in the arrest 20 years ago of the husband of Canadian Nobel laureate Alice Munro, said Friday he was disturbed by the writer's reaction 20 years ago when she learned her husband would be charged for sexually assaulting her daughter. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

The Latest | Israeli minister's visit to Jerusalem holy site puts pressure on cease-fire talks

A leading far-right figure in the Israeli government visited Jerusalem’s most sensitive holy site on Thursday, a...

European leaders discuss migration and Ukraine at a UK summit as concern grows about direction of US

WOODSTOCK, England (AP) — Leaders from across Europe expressed support for Ukraine and concern about the...

Multiple failures, multiple investigations: Unraveling the attempted assassination of Donald Trump

BUTLER, Pa. (AP) — The young man was pacing around the edges of the Donald Trump campaign rally, shouldering a...

Syrian President Assad's Baath Party clinches control of parliament, election results show

DAMASCUS (AP) — The results of Syria’s parliamentary elections, announced Thursday, showed that President...

Paris police are sealing off the Seine River ahead of the Olympics opening ceremony

PARIS (AP) — A special kind of iron curtain came down across central Paris on Thursday, with the beginning of an...

Ursula von der Leyen reelected to a second 5-year term as European Commission president

STRASBOURG, France (AP) — Lawmakers at the European Parliament on Thursday reelected Ursula von der Leyen to a...

By Chris Levister for the NNPA from the Blackvoicenews.com

Praised for his "ferocious moral vision" Cornel West wasted little time living up to his reputation as one of America's most provocative public intellectuals. Speaking to a crowd of more than 1,000 people at Riverside City College (RCC) recently, the fiery orator took direct aim at President Barack Obama's policies toward the poor and working class calling them 'elitist and disappointing'.

"There's a Black man on top and millions of Black folks in the basement," said West.

"I applaud his brilliance and charisma, he changed the image of America, but where is the discourse on jobs for the working class and poor. He's giving speeches in Detroit but I won't hear him talking about that city's 25 percent unemployment among Black men. Job creation has been pushed to the margins." he said.

The culprit? Greed, says West, manifest in the action of players on Wall Street, "our televisual culture that's obsessed with superficial spectacle" and the education system "where the model becomes central."

He said the 'persistence of poverty produces levels of despair that deepen social conflict; the escalation of paranoia produces levels of distrust that reinforce cultural division'.

"There's a sense that the country is in paralysis. Americans like to believe they can solve any problem. When they're in paralysis they start blaming folk. Unfortunately, they blame the weak they scapegoat," said West in interviews before and after his lecture.

West urged President Obama to resists calls from Republicans, who this month took control of the House of Representatives and closed in on the Democrat's Senate majority.

"He loves consensus, he loves bipartisan agreement and that's fine, but when it's clear that the other side has absolutely no interest whatsoever in that kind of consensus, you got to draw a line in the sand and dig in," he said.

"He's got an active right wing out there, a recession inherited from Bush, an unpopular war in Afghanistan, massive unemployment and soaring poverty. With those kinds of weighty issues you can't move into a kumbaya mode of existence. Instead, he's got to show backbone."

West said like Abraham Lincoln who led the abolitionist movement, like Franklin D. Roosevelt who led the labor movement, the president must create his own progressive movement to push his agenda for hope and change.

He warned that if President Obama fails to keep alive the legacy of Martin Luther King, Cesar Chavez, and other great civil rights leaders he will end up as "just another colorful caretaker of an empire in decline and a culture in decay."

Throughout his lecture, West, a professor of Religion at Princeton University, spoke of paideia. Paideia is Greek for education and instruction. "Students go to school and are still not educated. I don't hear our president talking about the new Jim Crow, the prison industrial complex. There is this pervasive notion that Black and Latino men are better off in the prison than in the classroom."

He had harsh words for the Black church "you see an ATM before you see the cross," he said. "There's a spiritual malnutrition tied to moral constipation, where people have a sense of what's right and what's good. They can't get it out because there's too much greed. It's just stuck. There's too much obsession with political and social reputation and addiction to narrow conceptions of success."

Following his talk, West sat on the stage with about 20 RCC students. He highlighted some of his philosophy on blues music, ideas on social justice, and universal love, which he called "spillover love." He made connections between music, social problems, democracy, and philosophy.

He challenged the students to "Lift Every Voice." "You need to look beyond the words in the book and understand the true philosophy behind them," he said. "People need to find their own voice and not be an echo and be original."

He related this back to modern music and how some artists' are copying from the greats such as Duke Ellington and Nina Simone.

Many of the students and members of the audience appeared awestruck by the colorful scholar, who has been described as an "intellectual provocateur". Not many of them knew that West was kicked out of school in the third grade. He refused to say the Pledge of Allegiance to the American flag. "My uncle was lynched and then wrapped in the flag," West recalled. He credits the power of love in the West family. "They provided a positive outlook for the rage instilled in me."

When a student asked if America could ever be free of racism, West struggled lacing his fingers his exuberant expression sat on pause.

"I pray for America. I pray hard for America. I pray for our president" he said, leaving the question unanswered.

"Race is the most explosive issue in American life precisely because it forces us to confront the tragic facts of poverty and paranoia, despair and distrust," he said as he signed autographs after the event.

West burst onto the national scene in 1993 with his bestselling book Race Matters, a searing analysis of racism in American democracy. In his life story Brother West: Living and Loving Out Loud, he offers a compelling exploration of his heart behind the human mind.

He has published 19 other books and was an influential force in developing the storyline for the popular Matrix movie trilogy. Dr. West graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University and has a Ph.D. from Princeton.

"His viewpoints are radical and passionately felt," said retired civil rights attorney, Evan Babitsky who traveled 90 miles to hear West.

"He is not afraid to speak frankly and from the heart," said Babitsky "While he presents many criticisms, he also offers many solutions. Not everyone will agree with his point of view, but if one of his objectives is to make people at least think about the problems he has dissected then he has succeeded admirably."



PHOTO: Dr. Cornel West talks with the President of Norco College, Dr. Brenda Davis, before his appearance at Riverside City College