07-14-2024  7:38 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather

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NORTHWEST NEWS

Wildfire Risk Rises as Western States Dry out Amid Ongoing Heat Wave Baking Most of the US

Blazes are burning in Oregon, where the governor issued an emergency authorization allowing additional firefighting resources to be deployed. More than 142 million people around the U.S. were under heat alerts Wednesday, especially across the West, where dozens of locations tied or broke heat records.

Forum Explores Dangerous Intersection of Brain Injury and Law Enforcement

The Portland Committee on Community-Engaged Policing hosted event with medical, legal and first-hand perspectives.

2 Men Drown in Glacier National Park Over the July 4 Holiday Weekend

 A 26-year-old man from India slipped on rocks and was swept away in Avalanche Creek on Saturday morning. His body has not been recovered. And a 28-year-old man from Nepal who was not an experienced swimmer drowned in Lake McDonald near Sprague Creek Campground on Saturday evening. His body was recovered by a sheriff's dive team.

Records Shatter as Heatwave Threatens 130 million Across U.S. 

Roughly 130 million people are under threat from a long-running heat wave that already has broken records with dangerously high temperatures and is expected to shatter more inot next week from the Pacific Northwest to the Mid-Alantic states and the Northeast. Forecasters say temperatures could spike above 100 degrees in Oregon, where records could be broken in cities such as Eugene, Portland and Salem

NEWS BRIEFS

Echohawk Selected for Small Business Regulatory Fairness Board

Indigenous woman and executive leader of Snoqualmie-owned enterprise to serve on national board advancing regulatory fairness and...

HUD Reaches Settlement to Ensure Equal Opportunity in the Appraisal Profession

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced today that it has entered into an historic Conciliation...

HUD Expands Program to Help Homeowners Repair Homes

The newly updated Federal Housing Administration Program will assist families looking for affordable financing to repair, purchase, or...

UFCW 555 Turns in Signatures for Initiative Petition 35 - United for Cannabis Workers Act

On July 5, United Food and Commercial Workers Local 555 delivered over 163,000 signatures to the Oregon Secretary of...

Local Photographer Announces Re-Release of Her Book

Kelly Ruthe Johnson, a nationally recognized photographer and author based in Portland, Oregon, has announced the re-release of her...

Things to know about heat deaths as a dangerously hot summer shapes up in the western US

PHOENIX (AP) — A dangerously hot summer is shaping up in the U.S. West, with heat suspected in dozens of recent deaths, including retirees in Oregon, a motorcyclist in Death Valley, California and a 10-year-old boy who collapsed while hiking with his family on a Phoenix trail. Heat...

California reports first wildfire death of the 2024 season as fires persist across the West

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Wildfires fueled by strong winds and an extended heat wave have led to the first death in California of the 2024 season, while wind-whipped flames in Arizona have forced hundreds to flee from what tribal leaders are calling the “most serious” wildfire on their reservation...

Missouri governor says new public aid plan in the works for Chiefs, Royals stadiums

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Thursday that he expects the state to put together an aid plan by the end of the year to try to keep the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals from being lured across state lines to new stadiums in Kansas. Missouri's renewed efforts...

Kansas governor signs bills enabling effort to entice Chiefs and Royals with new stadiums

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas' governor signed legislation Friday enabling the state to lure the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs and Major League Baseball's Royals away from neighboring Missouri by helping the teams pay for new stadiums. Gov. Laura Kelly's action came three days...

OPINION

Minding the Debate: What’s Happening to Our Brains During Election Season

The June 27 presidential debate is the real start of the election season, when more Americans start to pay attention. It’s when partisan rhetoric runs hot and emotions run high. It’s also a chance for us, as members of a democratic republic. How? By...

State of the Nation’s Housing 2024: The Cost of the American Dream Jumped 47 Percent Since 2020

Only 1 in 7 renters can afford homeownership, homelessness at an all-time high ...

Juneteenth is a Sacred American Holiday

Today, when our history is threatened by erasure, our communities are being dismantled by systemic disinvestment, Juneteenth can serve as a rallying cry for communal healing and collective action. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Historically Black town in Louisiana's Cancer Alley is divided over a planned grain terminal

WALLACE, La. (AP) — Sisters Jo and Dr. Joy Banner live just miles from where their ancestors were enslaved more than 200 years ago in St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana. Their tidy Creole cottage cafe in the small riverfront town of Wallace lies yards from property their great-grandparents...

Pastors see a wariness among Black men to talk abortion politics as Biden works to shore up base

WASHINGTON (AP) — Phoenix pastor the Rev. Warren H. Stewart Sr. has had countless discussions this election season with fellow Black men on the economy, criminal justice, immigration and other issues dominating the political landscape in their battleground state of Arizona. But never abortion. ...

Morehouse College president says he will retire next June

ATLANTA (AP) — Morehouse College President David Thomas announced that he will retire next year, saying it is time for new leadership at the prominent all-male, historically Black school he has led since 2018. Thomas, 67, said in a statement Friday that he will retire June 30,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Book Review: 'Hey, Zoey' uses questions about AI to look at women's autonomy in a new light

Dolores is going through the motions of life when she finds a potentially marriage-ending surprise in her garage: a high-end, lifelike sex doll imbued with artificial intelligence named Zoey. There are a lot of places that author Sarah Crossan can go from here — when is it cheating?...

Book Review: 'Loving Sylvia Plath' attends to polarizing writer's circumstances more than her work

A popular form of writing nowadays is one that involves reexamining the lives of people, often members of marginalized groups, who have otherwise been flattened or short-changed by history. How has society’s assumptions or prejudices informed how a person is remembered, many authors...

Book Review: Gonzo journalist Barrett Brown’s memoir a piquant take on hacktivism’s rise

His talents in full flower and basking in public admiration, gonzo journalist and inveterate anti-establishment troublemaker Barrett Brown is jailed in his native Texas on various federal felony charges. It is 2013 and Brown’s adventures have included helping Anonymous hacktivists...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP PHOTOS: Shooting at Trump rally in Pennsylvania

This collection of photos shows the aftermath of a shooting at former President Donald Trump's rally in Butler,...

A few short minutes after Trump took the stage, shots rang out

BUTLER, Pa. (AP) — At 6:02 pm Saturday, to the strains of “God Bless the U.S.A.,” former President Donald...

Carlos Alcaraz wins Wimbledon by beating Novak Djokovic and now owns 4 Slam titles at age 21

LONDON (AP) — Carlos Alcaraz was ready from the get-go this time. A year ago in the Wimbledon final against...

Scientists, a journalist and even a bakery worker are among those convicted of treason in Russia

TALLINN, Estonia (AP) — Over the past decade, Russia has seen a sharp increase in treason and espionage cases. ...

A Pakistani court acquits ex-PM Khan but supporters' hopes of his release are dashed

ISLAMABAD (AP) — A Pakistani court on Saturday overturned the convictions and seven-year sentences of former...

What to know about the growing number of treason and espionage cases in today's Russia under Putin

Treason cases were rare in Russia 30 years ago, with only a handful brought annually. In the past decade and...

Mariano Castillo CNN

(CNN) -- An Argentinian judge has ordered Facebook to remove a profile from its site that allegedly was defaming a local business.

Judge Nestor Osvaldo Garcia also said that going forward, the social networking giant must prohibit any content that "insults, offends, assaults, violates, impairs or affects the privacy (or) commercial activity" of a bookstore, Librerias Lader.

The ruling, which came down Monday, is the not the first in which Argentina's judiciary has ordered Facebook to delete or modify content on its site.

The bookstore was founded in the city of Rosario, about 185 miles northwest of Buenos Aires, some 30 years ago, and now consists of eight locations there.

Recently, Librerias Lader became the target of an anonymous Facebook profile that threatened the store's management, said Marcelo Fizzani, the chain's sales manager.

The bookstore owners suspect that behind the offending profile -- which was registered with a fictitious name -- were one or more former employees.

The profile accused Librerias Lader of exploiting its workers and named specific managers by name, Fizzani said.

The profile page went as far as publishing the addresses of the eight bookstore locations, together with the codes to disarm the alarm system, he said.

"We then contacted our lawyers," Fizzani said. "The goal was to remove the page. It was affecting our work and the safety of the people who work here."

Business, however, was not affected negatively by the Facebook postings, he said.

"The right to one's own image is a personal right, individual, like an extension of personality, contained within the limits of a person's privacy. Therefore, everyone has an exclusive right over his image that extends to its use, such that one can oppose its distribution when done so without authorization," the ruling states.

The judge didn't take into account whether the accusations being made against the bookstore were true or not. If indeed there are violations happening at Librerias Lader, the complainants should abide by the legal avenues for making denunciations, the judge wrote.

To do otherwise, as the anonymous Facebook page did, "is to enter a path with no return that implies the belief that 'justice' is being done by one's self, which is nothing more than a return to a time when man roamed thousands of years ago seeking to substitute reason for force and force for reason," the ruling states.

Representatives for Facebook on Tuesday said they had not read the ruling and could not comment. However, the offending profile appeared to no longer be on the site.

Outside free speech considerations, it is possible that the profile in question violated Facebook's terms of use. It is against Facebook rules to threaten to harm others.

The global reach of social media means that companies have to deal with different freedom of speech laws in different parts of the world, said Jeff Hermes, director of the Digital Media Law Project at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society.

"You face a very different philosophy as far as freedom of the press, freedom of speech and the role of government," he said.

In this case, U.S. law and Argentinian law may not coincide. In the United States, there is usually not a right to privacy in cases where someone's image is used in a nonexploitative way, Hermes said. Argentinian law appears to give much more strength to the right of privacy of its citizens.

It puts companies in a position where they have to decide whether or not to abide by such rulings, or to block offending content in some countries, but allow it in others.

"It becomes a very difficult patchwork," Hermes said.

In 2010, a judge in the Argentinian city of Rafaela ordered Facebook to remove a fake profile of a man. The man argued that someone used his name and photo to build a profile and made claims about his sexual orientation. That ruling also ordered Google, Yahoo! and Bing to amend its search engines so that the offending page would not show up in search results.

Also that year, a judge in Mendoza ordered Facebook to close all "groups" created by minors that promoted truancy and other delinquency. That ruling said the social networking site should remove all groups made by minors that "promote objectives that could cause harm" to them.